Determiners and quantifiers

Determiners and quantifiers are words we use in front of nouns. We use determiners to identify things (this book, my sister) and we use quantifiers to say how much or how many (a few people, a lot of problems).

Read clear grammar explanations and example sentences to help you understand how determiners and quantifiers are used. Then, put your grammar knowledge into practice by doing the exercises.  

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Hello pumbi,

Sentences 1 and 2 are correct but mean different things. One means the information you have isn't enough ('more' is a quantifier) and two (where 'more' is an adverb) means that of two different things you need, the need for information is greater.

Sentences 3 and 4 are not correct. Perhaps you mean 'Click here for more answers'? 'Click here for answers more' is not correct.

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Rox4090 提交于 周三, 13/12/2017 - 11:25

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Hi, Given the population explosion, unemployment is increased. Given the population explosion, unemployment could increase. Are these sentence correct. What is the difference between both the sentences by changing the verb?

Hello Rox4090,

Both are grammatically correct but the first one is unusual. This is because it has a passive verb, which implies that someone is controlling unemployment. The second, in which 'increase' is an intransitive verb, means that unemployment rates may change as a consequence of changes in population. The second also of course uses the modal verb 'could' to express possibility.

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Rox4090 提交于 周二, 12/12/2017 - 11:12

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Hi, Given parents are often already overburdened with family life, it can become increasingly difficult to manage meltdowns in a constructive and healthy manner. Verbs “are and can”. Why? Normally, in Sentences started with “ Given” We use could or might. Could you please clarify. Regards, Rox4090

Hello Rox4090,

Here 'given' means something like 'considering' or 'taking into account the fact that'. I'm not familiar with the rule that sentences beginning with 'given' use the verb 'could' or 'might', so I'm afraid I can't comment on that other than to say that the sentence is correct and sounds perfectly natural to me.

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Rox4090 提交于 周二, 12/12/2017 - 03:50

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Hi, Sentence: A motorcyclist was injured on Sunday after he drove into a plastic kite string in New Jersey, injuring his fingers and ears. Phrase: injuring his fingers and ears. What is this type of phrase called? How can we write such type of phrases? Please teach us . Regards, Rox4090

Peter M. 提交于 周二, 12/12/2017 - 05:43

Rox4090 回复

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Hi Rox4090,

This is an example of a participle phrase (sometimes also called a participle clause). We have a page devoted to this topic with explanations and examples of how these forms are used and you can find that page here.

 

Best wishes,

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Hi again, Could you please clarify what function is performing by that clause. As the position of the clause is at the end of the sentence, I wonder what it emphasises. Is it emphasises the subordinate clause or the principal one? Are these type clauses modify principal clauses or the subordinate ones? Why the writer had not place the clause in the beginning ? I can see such clauses mentioned in the start of the sentences on the learn English website. I an confused as I could not make sense of the clause in my mind . If the sentence could be explained in parts, it would be wonderful. By breaking the sentence into parts, it can be clearly understood which clause is performing what function. Regards , Rox4090

Hello again Rox4090,

I assume you're referring the participle clause in the sentence you provided earlier:

A motorcyclist was injured on Sunday after he drove into a plastic kite string in New Jersey, injuring his fingers and ears.

Did you take a look at the page I linked to in my earlier answer? The function of the participle clause here is described on that page:

Participle clauses give information about condition, reason, result or time.

In your sentence 'injuring his fingers and ears' describes the result of the action 'he drove into...'. It means in effect 'he drove into... which injured his fingers and ear'.

The reason this clause comes at the end is that it describes a result. Putting the result before the cause would be rather odd logically and would make the sentence difficult to follow. When the clause describes purpose it generally comes at the beginning of the sentence, though there is more flexibility than with a result clause.

The participle clause here is a subordinate clause. In fact, whether it is better to describe these forms as clauses or phrases is a moot point and arguments can be made either way. You can read a little about this on the relevant wikipedia page (here).

 

Best wishes,

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Hi, Thank you for the swift reply. Now, I got it that clause describing result comes at the end of the sentence. How about the place of the clauses describing condition, reason and time? If you could enlighten me on this, It would be appreciable. Regards, Rox4090

Peter M. 提交于 周一, 18/12/2017 - 05:54

Rox4090 回复

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Hi Rox4090,

The positioning of these clauses varies depending on the context and intention of the speaker. You can emphasise different actions in different ways and create different stylistic patterns by varying the order of the clauses. There may also be certain conventions/common patterns of use which hold most of the time for particular examples.

 

Best wishes,

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Hi, How can we emphasise actions and also that in different ways? Could you please elaborate and explain it with some links and examples

Rox4090 提交于 周六, 02/12/2017 - 04:10

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Hi Sometimes in the punctuation case of a sentence, “ the” word is used. But in some case it is not used. For example- to the school, to the market. On the pretext. To the government. Why “the” is used here?? Without ” the”- Is not in a position. ( “a” instead of the) The girl’s mother works at a doctor’s clinics.( “a” instead of the) Offender was thrashed for several hours by a policeman. ( a instead of the) The girl gave birth to a girl ( a instead of the) The girl belongs to a village in Tehri district. ( not “ the “ is used) A student of class 10 ( the is not used here) Please explain why “the” is replaced by “a”. Also, please explain why “ the” is not used in some punctuation cases like in the last two sentences mentioned above. Please clear our doubts on this topic thoroughly. Best regards, Rox4090

Peter M. 提交于 周六, 02/12/2017 - 08:15

Rox4090 回复

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Hi Rox4090,

We use articles to show if the thing which we are talking about is known (identified) or not known (unidentified) to the speaker and listener. For example:

Let's go to a restaurant. [it could be any restaurant, no particular restaurant is intended]

Let's go to the restaurant. [the speaker is thinking of a particular restaurant and thinks that the listener also knows which restaurant is meant]

 

This is the key distinction between 'a' and 'the' and it is really a question of the context and of what knowledge the speaker and listener share, rather than being a purely grammatical question.

 

You have a lot of examples in your question and we can't really provide detailed explanations of multiple examples. We're happy, of course to help our users as much as we can but we are a small team here at LearnEnglish and deal with many questions every day. However, we have several pages on this topic:

the indefinite article 'a'

the definite article 'the'

three golden rules

other rules

 

Please take a look at these pages and compare your sentences with the examples there. I think you will be able to find the explanations yourself that way and if you work it out in this way you will remember it far better than if we simply tell you. You can post your own explanations in a comment on one of those pages and we'll be happy to tell you if your explanations are correct.

 

Best wishes,

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Thank you for the reply. Please tell me why no article is used in this sentence. A student of class 10 is on a winning streak. Why “ the” is not used after the word “ of” in the above sentence. Best regards, Rox4090

Hello Rox4090,

'Class 10' here is treated as a name and therefore no article is used. Similarly, we also say 'a student in year 5' and 'the room is on floor 24'. Note that when we use ordinals we often use the definite article. Thus we say 'a student in the fifth year' and 'the room is on the 24th floor'. This is because ordinals are generally descriptive (showing a position in a sequence or list) rather than forming names. However, there are exceptions, notably 'a student in fifth grade'.

 

Note that this is a rule of thumb and there are exceptions. For example, when we talk about vehicles we use definite articles, so we say 'the Renault Clio 2' and 'the Saturn V rocket'. Some other groups take a definite article as well, such as 'the G7' and 'the Birmingham Six' (a group of men at the centre of a famous UK crime scandal).

 

Best wishes,

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Rox4090 提交于 周五, 01/12/2017 - 10:54

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hi, How can we use the word“ this” for linking with previous sentence? Please provide some examples and explain the role played “This”. Also, when we use “This” for linking , is it connecting the whole previous sentence or only a part of that sentence. If you could solve the whole puzzle of using the word “This”, I would be very grateful to you. By this I mean, I might forget some points to ask you on this topic and if you think some other important information should be added to this topic, please do so. Best regards, Rox4090

Hello Rox4090,

This is actually quite a big topic, since 'this' is used in so many different ways and to mean different things. I'm afraid I can't possibly cover all of them, but, for example, consider 'it', 'this' and 'that' when used as pronouns.

All three are commonly used to refer back to situations that have just been mentioned. 'it' has no emphasis, whereas 'this' and 'that' put more focus on the situation. If you are making a simple statement about the previous thing, both 'this' and 'that' are appropriate, but if you're going to speak at length about the situation, 'this' is better.

If you could give a specific example of a sentence (with context) that you struggle to understand, we will do our best to help you understand it. You might also want to check out the Wikipedia article on Deixis -- especially the Place deixis section -- though it's quite technical.

I hope this helps you.

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

MCWSL 提交于 周二, 14/11/2017 - 22:02

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Hello Is this sentence correct? It's strange to me because of the 'a': 'What makes you think he is a him' Thank you.

Hello MCWSL,

Yes, that is correct. The object form of personal pronouns is usually used after the verb 'be', especially in simple copulas (such as this case). It's a bit strange, really, but it's how native speakers speak.

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

JakiGeh 提交于 周二, 07/11/2017 - 18:37

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Hello, Why do we use ''a'' article with numbers when giving a number to something; for example, ''I give you a seven for the appearance'' Thank you in advance.

Hello JakiGeh,

Here the idea is that you are giving a rating or measurement -- it's as if you were saying 'I give you a (rating of) seven'.

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Hi, what is the difference between " How do you feel about John?" and " How do you feel about John"? Best regards, Abdullah

Hello Abdullah,

Different style guides make different recommendations on how to punctuate sentences.  I'd say that most would punctuate a question the first way, i.e. with the question mark inside the quotation marks. There is no difference in meaning between them.

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Mannkhan 提交于 周日, 01/10/2017 - 18:00

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Whose coat is this? Does this sentence contain two specific determiners namely "whose" and "this"?

Hello Mannkhan,

'Whose' is a determiner in this example but 'this' is a demonstrative pronoun.

 

Best wishes,

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Akash23 提交于 周五, 15/09/2017 - 12:13

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Sir I have eat and I have eaten Which one is right

Peter M. 提交于 周六, 16/09/2017 - 08:57

Akash23 回复

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Hello Akash23,

'I have eat' is not a correct form.

'I have eaten' is a possible form. Whether or not it is correct will depend upon the sentence in which it is used and the context, of course.

 

Best wishes,

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Nguyenhai 提交于 周四, 07/09/2017 - 00:13

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Dear Sir, Could you tell me which one is correct? A. 2 other students B. The 2 other students C. Other 2 students D. The other 2 students E. Another 2 students F. 2 another students Thank you very much Hai

Hello Hai,

I'm afraid we don't provide answers to tasks from elsewhere. We're a small team here and if we tried to answer questions like this we would end up doing our users' homework and tests for them, which is just not possible with so many users. I can tell you that several of these are grammatically correct but which is needed in a given context will depend upon that context.

 

Best wishes,

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Hello Peter M Thank you for the reply. I would to make you understand that I didn't ask you for my homework because I am not a student. I know how to use "other and another" but I am a bit confused when I use them with a number. I read some grammar books and I found that we can use other and another before the number like another 5 people, the other 5 people or another few years. However, when I was reading some articles online, I came across something like "three other surgical interventions, 2 other students or a few other friends. Therefore, I made a list of possible answers and asked you. I hope you can help. Best wishes Hai

Hello Nguyenhai,

I understand. We get a lot of requests to help with exercises from tests and the like and obviously we avoid doing these. Generally, [two other + plural noun] and [another two + plural noun] are interchangeable, while [the two other + plural noun] and [the other two + plural noun] are used interchangeably when talking about known examples.

In answer to your initial questions:

A. 2 other students

This is correct. It means 'two students who were not included in the earlier group'. You might say this when you are talking about a group of students and two new ones arrive, for example.


B. The 2 other students

This is also correct. The meaning here is the same as above but you would use 'the' when the two students have been mentioned before and you are referring back to them.


C. Other 2 students

This is not correct. You would need to say either 'another' or 'the other', depending on whether you have mentioned them before.


D. The other 2 students

This is correct.


E. Another 2 students

This is correct.


F. 2 another students

This is not correct. We can use 'another' before a number, not after.

 

I hope that clarifies it for you.

 

Best wishes,

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Hello, about "other, others, the other, the others", could you clarify more? I'm still not clear after reading examples in dictionaries. 1. other (pronoun) = other (adjective) + singular noun ( correct ?) 2. others (pronoun) = other (adjective) + plural noun ( correct ?) 3. the other or the others = the remaining part of a group (2-member-group, or more-than-3-member-group) ( correct ?) 4. Some designs are better than others ( but it seems "others" here means the remaining part? what's the difference in meaning if use "the others"?) 5. This option is preferable to any other (but it seems "other" refer to the remaining part ?) 6. Mr Harris and 3 other teachers were there. (what is the difference without "other" here ?)

MCWSL 提交于 周六, 02/09/2017 - 20:18

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Hello, ''I have realized an adult’s primary responsibilities'' Why does ''an'' have to be included here even if we have a plural noun? Thank you.

Hello MCWSL,

The noun here is singular: adult. It is a possessive form followed by a plural noun.

Here are some similar examples:

I like my son's friends. ['son' is singular; 'friends' is plural]

 

I have a problem with my car's electrics. ['car' is singular; 'electrics' is plural]

 

Best wishes,

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Petals 提交于 周六, 02/09/2017 - 08:24

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Hello, Is it correct to use 'a last few months/days of work/college, then back to...' Is it the same as 'a few more days of... Regards, Petals

Hello Petals,

In general, I'd say that 'a last few days' and 'a few more days' don't mean exactly the same thing, but it'd be helpful to know the full sentence and context to say that for sure.

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Brijesh chaudhary 提交于 周六, 26/08/2017 - 22:31

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Namaste ,sir what is difference between adjective and determiners

Hello Brijesh chaudhary,

Both adjectives and determiners are used before nouns. However, where adjectives modify the noun, changing the meaning, determiners introduce the noun, providing information about it such as whether or not it is unique. For this reason, most grammarians include determiners as a separate category.

You can read a discussion of the topic on this page in the 'Description' section.

 

Best wishes,

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Shaitan69 提交于 周一, 21/08/2017 - 18:14

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Look at 'those' lovely flowers. Dear sir can we use 'These' instead of 'Those' in this sentence above.

Hello Shaitan69,

In general, yes, you can, though depending on the context only one or the other might be correct.

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Hello Shaitan69,

In general, yes, you can, though depending on the context only one or the other might be correct.

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Hello, how can I identify the word "many" as an determiner with the same as an adjective or pronoun? Thank you for your help in advance .

Hello Bahraam,

I'm afraid I don't understand what you mean. Could you try to rephrase the question, and to include an example of what you mean? It's always helpful to include an example sentence, I think.

 

Best wishes,

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Hello Dear Sir In this sentence- He passed away very suddenly few days ago. My problem, is it few days ago or a few days ago?

Hello sujit,

In this sentence you need 'a few'. 'Few' by itself is not correct.

 

Best wishes,

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

4mystudents 提交于 周日, 23/07/2017 - 23:11

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Hello, Please; I would like to know Why we can't use the article 'the' in 'she believes progress has been made in THE teacher education'; isn't 'teacher education' specific? or should it be 'The teacher's education' to use 'the' Thank you in advance

Hello 4mystudents,

The phrase 'teacher education' describes the general concept, not a specific example. The word 'teacher' here functions as an adjective, describing a particular kind of education.

If you want to talk about the education which a particular teacher received then you would say 'the teacher's education', as you suggest.

 

Best wishes,

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Ashima 提交于 周三, 28/06/2017 - 07:08

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Please help...what is correct - Is the article 'the' required before 'insurance transactions' or the article 'the' is not required before 'insurance transactions' in the following sentence: The integration will enable XYZ to process insurance transactions required for the initial implementation of the application. or The integration will enable XYZ to process the insurance transactions required for the initial implementation of the application.