Pronouns

Pronouns are words that take the place of nouns. We often use them to avoid repeating the nouns that they refer to. Pronouns have different forms for the different ways we use them. 

Read clear grammar explanations and example sentences to help you understand how pronouns are used. Then, put your grammar knowledge into practice by doing the exercises.  

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Hello amirfd

Yes, that is grammatically correct. The way it is written sounds more natural, however.

All the best

Kirk

The LearnEnglish Team

SonuKumar 提交于 周四, 30/05/2019 - 23:22

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Sir, I feel like a room without a roof. Dose it mean that I feel like I'm a room without a roof or I like a room without a roof ? He recognises the body as that of his friend. Can I also write like this: He recognises the body as of his friend or his friend's ?

Peter M. 提交于 周五, 31/05/2019 - 08:20

SonuKumar 回复

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Hello SonuKumar, In your first example, 'I feel like...' describes a person's emotional or mental state, not what they like or don't like. ~ In your second example, you can say either of these: > ...the body as that of his friend > ...the body as his friend's ~ Peter The LearnEnglish Team

Carolina19 提交于 周一, 29/04/2019 - 02:54

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Hello, take the level test, say that I am in the intermediate but I feel that in grammar I am not very good. Is it recommendable to start from the basics?
Hi Carolina19 It's difficult to give you specific advice without knowing you better, but in general I'd encourage you to start with reading or listening resources. We have a lot of new pages at the B2 level in our Skills section (https://learnenglish.britishcouncil.org/skills), for example, or there are lots of videos at the intermediate level in the Video zone (https://learnenglish.britishcouncil.org/video-zone) and Word on the Street (https://learnenglish.britishcouncil.org/word-street) and audio in LearnEnglish podcasts (https://learnenglish.britishcouncil.org/learnenglish-podcasts). Whenever you find some grammar that you don't understand or that you want to review, you can probably find it here in the English Grammar section. If you can't find more information about it, please feel free to ask us for help in the Comments section on the page you are working on and we'll help you. But if you want to focus on grammar from the beginning, this section is a good place to start. Please note that the pages here are not organised in a sequence, but rather by topic. If you have trouble finding something, please let us know. I hope this helps orient you. If you have any other questions, please don't hesitate to ask us. All the best Kirk The LearnEnglish Team
Sir , Please let me know about Infinitives ?
Hello Imran 26, You can read about infinitives on this page: https://learnenglish.britishcouncil.org/english-grammar/infinitive ~ You can also search for pages related to the topic by typing 'infinitive' into the search window on this page. Look for the magnifying glass at the top right. https://learnenglish.britishcouncil.org/search/apachesolr_search/infinitive ~ Peter The LearnEnglish Team
hello how can i find my all comments and replies from you.
Hello INS-PRAKASH, New comments appear on the last page of the comments section once they have been approved, so if you go there you will see your comment. All comments are read before they are published, so there is usually a short delay between posting your comment and it appearing on the site. You can also go to your account page and click on 'Track'. This should show recent activity. ~ Peter The LearnEnglish Team

Akash Rathore 提交于 周四, 11/04/2019 - 13:42

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Hello sir please help to clarify, Which one is correct? The team are divided in its opinion. The team are divided in their opinions.
Hello Akash Rathore The first one is not consistent and is not grammatical. 'are' as a plural verb and 'its' as a singular determiner are in conflict. The second one is OK. 'The team is divided in its opinions.' is also correct. All the best Kirk The LearnEnglish Team

Aturjong Jr. 提交于 周一, 04/03/2019 - 13:17

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Hi Sir, how are you doing? sir i would like always to learn English so that i can join global citizens in expressing myself, i always end up being embarrass by my friends just because i lack grammatical construction and my pronunciation is very very terrible. i am not able to sometimes to differentiate pronunciation of letter (F) and letter (p) among other many words. all in all my English is completely terrible. can you please advice on how quick i can able to learn very fast?

Hello Aturjong Jr.

We're very glad to have you hear. I would recommend you read our Getting started and Frequently asked questions pages first. There you can find lots of advice on how to get the most out of our site.

Then if you have any specific questions about something on a page, you are welcome to ask them in a comment there.

Welcome and good luck!

All the best

Kirk

The LearnEnglish Team

Zeeshan Siddiqii 提交于 周六, 02/03/2019 - 09:39

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Does the use of 'the way' in the following sentence have any error? Please note that there is a clause "is it right to do so?" at the end. [My question to you is that the way I slaughtered the hen while holding her tongue out, is it right to do so?] Secondly, 'her' has been used for "a hen" , is this ok in this sentence?

Hello Zeeshan Siddiqii,

I think there is a problem with using 'the way' (a noun) and 'do so' (a question about an action) together. We would usually use its for a hen rather than she, though she is not incorrect.

I would suggest any one of several alternatives:

My question to you is this: Is the way I slaughtered the hen while holding its tongue out right?

My question to you is this: I slaughtered the hen while holding her tongue out; was it right to do so?

My question to you is this: Was I right to slaughter the hen while holding its tongue out?

 

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Great guidance. Thank you very much. If I say, "Some people think this act i.e. slaughtering the hen while holding her tongue out, necessary." and then we add what we believe: This is torturing the animal unnecessarily. Does this sentence [This is torturing the animal unnecessarily] sound natural? Or should there be some change in this?

Hello Zeeshan Siddiqii,

My only suggestion would be to use a linking device to show the contrast:

However, in my view / in our view this is...

 

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Hi Sir! Thanks for the response to my question. I can now use the both.
Thanks million sir. Your answer lives up to my satisfaction. I'm learning a lot from you. I am confused between this these two words: Alone, lone , and how to properly use them in the sentence. Which one is correct and why: He has done it alone He has done it lone. Thanks for the help.

Hello hawa100,

'Lone' is an adjective which is used only before a noun: a lone wolf, a lone hunter, a lone protester.

'Alone' as an adjective is used only in two ways. First, after the verb 'be': I was alone in the house. Second, after a noun to mean 'only': She alone knows the truth.

'Alone can also be an adverb: I worked alone all night.

 

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Sir, Could I say that "My Aim in life" might be a multiple purpose in my life but "The Aim of my life" specified or just one purpose in life?

Peter M. 提交于 周五, 08/02/2019 - 08:18

Imran 26 回复

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Hello Imran 26,

No, both phrases refer to a single (or most important) aim. You would use plural forms to talk about more than one aim:

My aims in life are...

The aims of my life are...

 

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Sir, I am a English teacher in school, today I was dictating to my student an Essay on topic "My aim in life" . My students say why there is preposition used "in", they say it might be " My Aim of life". please let me know what is the correct one that I could teach them.

Peter M. 提交于 周二, 05/02/2019 - 07:27

Imran 26 回复

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Hello Imran 26,

This is really a question of convention rather than rules. The phrase 'aim in life' is a common expression, as are 'purpose in life', 'goal in life' and 'ambition in life'.

You can use 'of' but note that we would then say 'the aim' (as 'of' identifies the noun) and use a possessive adjective: 'the aim of my life', 'the purpose of my life' and so on. However, as I said, 'in life' is the normal expression here.

 

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Thank you for being helpful. You're doing great job. I am satisfied with the answers. I have another concern and I would appreciate it if you could help me out. They have taught me that after the word " than" and " as" we always use the subject case. Example: So which of the following sentences is correct or wrong and why? 1.She is smarter than he. 2. Do as I do 3. Your job is more difficult than mine. 4. Your job is more difficult than I. 5. Your job is more difficult as mine. 6. You job is more difficult as I. Thanks for the help.

Hello hawa100

In informal situations,normally object forms are used after 'than' and 'as' (e.g. 'She is smarter than him').

Subject forms are more common in formal situations (e.g. sentences 1 and 2). When subject forms are used, a verb often follows them (as in 2).

The subject and object forms of the possessive pronoun 'mine' are identical. Sentence 3 is therefore correct and appropriate in both formal and informal situations.

Sentences 4 and 6 do not make sense because you are comparing a job with a person.

Sentence 5 is not correct because 'as' is not used after a comparison with 'more'. You could say either 'Your job is as difficult as mine' or 'Your job is more difficult than mine', but you cannot mix these two kinds of comparison.

Hope that clears it up for you.

Best wishes

Kirk

The LearnEnglish Team

Adya's 提交于 周四, 31/01/2019 - 03:54

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Hi What could be the opposite of 'fast colour'? Thanks
Thank you sir once again for the help. I am still confused between the two: In front of people. And Before people. Could you please detail a little bit the both for me with examples ?

Hello hawa100

You can say both things. As Peter says, 'before' is probably better because it is often used to say that something happens in the presence of people. But you can use both of them and they describe a situation in which a person is talking and there are other people in front of her. It's not clear whether she is talking to those people or if they happen to be in the same general location as her.

For example, perhaps she is a politician explaining her campaign to a news reporter, but there are other people listening. She is not exactly speaking to those people, but they are there and hear her.

I would probably say this another way, depending on what I meant, but it is correct.

All the best

Kirk

The LearnEnglish Team

Hi sir! Thank you very much for the quick response. I am sorry. My question was about the physical position. When it comes to that, when to use in front of and before? Example: So which of the following sentence is correct? Thank you for giving me opportunity to comment on this topic before you. Or Thank you for giving me opportunity to comment on this topic in front of you.

Hello hawa100,

Both in front of and before can be used to describe location. However, before carries a sense of 'in the presence of' as well as the physical location, and so fits this context rather better, I would say.

 

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Hi Sir! I would like to know If it's correct to say in front of people or before people. Which of the two sentences is correct? She was giving her opinion before people. She was giving her opinion in front of people.

Hello hawa100

The most common preposition here is 'to': 'She was explaining her opinion to people'. 'before' and 'in front of' suggest that it's her physical position that is important instead of her communication with those people.

All the best

Kirk

The LearnEnglish Team

Adya's 提交于 周二, 22/01/2019 - 14:20

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Hi Recently, I was reading a one act play in which there were two characters, an old man and a boy of fourteen. The old man says to the boy that young kids come here to steal apples, but he (the boy) is not so young. What does the old man mean, the kids coming there to steal apples are younger than this boy or older?

Kirk 提交于 周二, 22/01/2019 - 15:34

Adya's 回复

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Hi Adya's

I'm afraid it's difficult for me to say, as I haven't read the play. It's not clear to me, for example, whether the old man is including the boy he's speaking to in the category of 'young kids' or not. Some old people will call any child a 'young kid' since they are so much older than the young people.

All the best

Kirk

The LearnEnglish Team

Hi Sir, I am learning Cambridge Dictionary for Noun section , there are major class of Noun are " Common Noun, Proper Noun, Concrete Noun & Abstract Noun". Sir I gotta know that what About Collective Noun,Count Noun & Uncounted Noun? is they are class of Noun also ?
hi Sir, In below sentences there are written as Monday through Thursday. I didn't make it sense why the writer says it like that.. I have read this in news paper. "e-sports is part of the athletics department. Team members have access to athletic trainers and are put through light fitness training. Players attend practice Monday through Thursday, from 4:30 to 9 p.m., with an hour break for dinner."

Hi Imran 26,

'Monday through Thursday' means Monday and all the days between it and Thursday, i.e. Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday. 

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Hi Sir, I'm working in a corporate school as a English teacher for grad 5th to 7th. There are grammar books for academic curriculum; at the title of those books are written as English grammar skill book. At my student life I have learn the book in school was English Grammar and composition book. Sir please let me know whats the difference between the "composition book & skill books" ?

Hi Imran 26,

The titles of books are determined by publishers and by whatever traditions exist in a particular place, as it's important to meet the expectations of students and parents. In a British context, 'composition' refers only to writing, while 'skills' would describe all four language skills: reading, writing, speaking and listening.

 

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team

Adya's 提交于 周三, 14/11/2018 - 16:29

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Hi I think 'had' is the correct option. The sentence is in the reported speech, with a past tense reporting verb, 'said'. As such the reported part too should have a past tense verb.
Sir, A Student belongs to a university distinguish me about IT & Software Engineering like that way; " IT guys does the developing work while the Software Engineers does the programming job" I could make sense with it why did she use " while" in this sentence.

Hello Imran,

In this sentence, 'while' means 'but', which is one of several meanings of this word (if you follow the link, you'll see the definition and examples for this meaning, but if you move up and down the page you will see the others). Please note that in this sentence, the verb should be 'do' instead of 'does', since 'IT guys' and 'software sngineers' are plural subjects.

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Sir, In school time I have read different kinds of noun like,abstract noun,materials noun & other. but I haven't found such kind of noun here. Please let me know the purpose. thank you.

Hi Imran,

Our grammar covers what its author (Dave Willis) thought were the most essential points learners need to become proficient speakers. It is not a comprehensive grammar -- a complete grammar of English would be very large and would not really fulfil the purpose of our site.

The Wikipedia and Cambridge Dictionary websites are good places to begin checking some topics such as the ones you mention. For example, the Wikipedia Noun page has a section on abstract and concrete nouns and the Cambridge Dictionary page on Nouns also explains this to some degree.

If you have any specific questions about a particular point, please let us know.

All the best,
Kirk
The LearnEnglish Team

Hello Sir, I have no concept how to appropriate use of "while" & "during". Please let me sense of it.

Hello Imran26,

The meanings of 'while' and 'during' are very similar. Both describe the time within an ongoing activity or state. The difference is that each is followed by a different form.

After 'while' we need a clause with a subject and a verb, or else a present participle (-ing form):

I saw him while I was working.

I saw him while working.

 

After 'during' we need a noun:

I saw him during the meeting.

 

Peter

The LearnEnglish Team